Elodie Lauten in

Google and other search engines do not easily locate the more recent articles about Elodie Lauten in the New York Times database; oddly enough, some old reviews show up, but not the more significant one from 1984 by Bernard Holland "New Music Can Be Easy on the Ear". T his page attempts to remedy this technical issue.

New York Times Quotes about Elodie Lauten

"Elodie Lauten’s music extracts order from chaos." Bernard Holland

"Elegiac melodies...pungent and intriguing." Anthony Tommasini

"... a longtime fixture of the the city's new music community." Bernard Holland

"Lovely, effective and affecting... with clarity and directness..." Allan Kozinn

WAKING IN NEW YORK

MUSIC REVIEW; A Libretto via Ginsberg Captures a City's Spirit
By ALLAN KOZINN
Published: June 6, 2001

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Waking in New York'' is an opera without opera's attributes when it is actually a lovely, effective and affecting example of something else: a song cycle, for vocal ensemble and chamber orchestra. Ms. Lauten has treated Ginsberg's poetry and its underlying spirit carefully, even reverently. She tucked his personal and sometimes diarylike texts into her own agreeably melodic and eclectic style, but she also appears to have listened carefully for traces of the music that animated Ginsberg's soul. When she found them, both in direct references and by implication, she incorporated them into her settings in the form of blues melodies, the soulful wail of the gospel singer, hints of jazz and the insistent rhythms and bright melodies of pop music. Perhaps most crucially, she presented Ginsberg's texts with clarity and directness, never obscuring his ideas or pacing for the sake of a purely musical effect.

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GAIA CYCLE/ TRONIK INVOLUTIONS

Review/Music; Cycle With Origins in India
By BERNARD HOLLAND
Published: December 17, 1993

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Ms. Lauten has presented a cycle of 12 keys whose fundamental origin is the tonic note of Indian music (our low C-sharp at 136 cycles per second, not the concert hall's A = 440). The scales moreover are not major or minor but mutations of European and Asian modes. Creating synthesized sound out of an electronic keyboard, "The Gaia Cycle" offers the symmetry of 12 five-minute sections. Layers are placed atop percussion lines, and Ms. Lauten's keyboard playing noodles and decorates gracefully. Although repetition is a major engine of this music -- bringing with it a peaceful sense of stasis -- every section has its distinctive timbre, movement and emotional quality. "The Gaia Cycle" seems less interested in creating order than in finding order in natural processes. There is a certain serenity in this kind of acceptance.

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PIANO MUSIC

NEW MUSIC CAN BE EASY ON THE EAR E-MAIL
By BERNARD HOLLAND
Published: June 3, 1984

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The most innovative new music now showing up on records is often the least forbidding. ...Elodie Lauten, for example, is a French pianist living in New York whose music straddles the concert hall and the worlds of pop and jazz. Her ''Concerto for Piano and Orchestral Memory'' on the Cat Collectors' label stands in diametric opposition to the dour, renunciatory style of Ralph Shapey or Ben Johnston, whose music also appears on some new record releases. Miss Lauten's harmonic combinations are familiar - even well-worn - but it is the way they are used which makes them interesting. Her concerto's eight movements seem to occupy a series of circular orbits around which the music drifts. In Mr. Shapey's music, we feel order being forcibly extracted from surrounding chaos. Miss Lauten, on the other hand, acknowledges and accepts her chaotic world and seeks to burrow out a place within it. There are repeated piano figures, sometimes lazy, sometimes quite active, with constant small changes in accent and interval within the patterns. Miss Lauten's ''orchestra'' consists of three strings, trombone and processed tapes. It often drones in the background but at times joins with sounds from everyday life - birds, beeping video games, sirens.

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MICROTONAL MUSIC

A Bit Off Key and Proud of It
By ANTHONY TOMMASINI
Published: May 21, 1997

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A good example of what makes a microtonal piece microtonal was Elodie Lauten's ''Discombobulations.'' Its musical materials were nothing special, just some undulant repeated riffs for flute (Andrew Bolotowsky), specially tuned guitar (Jon Catler) and synthesizer (Ms. Lauten), over which the soprano Meredith Borden sang elegiac melodies in a stratospheric range. But the performers are adept at playing between the standard pitches, so the result was like some lilting minimalistic music that was slightly off pitch in a pungent and intriguing way.

NEW YORK TIMES LISTINGSSS

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WAKING IN NEW YORK. This musical portrait of the beat poet Allen Ginsberg is by Elodie Lauten, a longtime fixture in the city's new music community. (Holland).

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ARTS BRIEFING: HIGHLIGHTS; Opera: Works In Progress
Published: May 25, 2004
Thursday from 2 p.m. to 5:30, audiences can drop in and hear concert performances with the City Opera orchestra and full casts of singers in excerpts of works by the composers Tom Cipullo, Richard Danielpour, John Eaton, Jennifer Griffith, Daniel Felsenfeld, Donald Hagar, Elodie Lauten and Adam Silverman. (Tommasini )